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How to Incorporate Punk Fashion Into Your Look

how to incorporate punk fashion into your look How to Incorporate Punk Fashion Into Your Look

Adding some inspired elements to your existing look is never an easy thing. And with punk, it can be difficult to reconcile your existing image with the roughshod rock-and-roll look you’re trying to integrate.

Often times, it’s better to use small, but apparent additions to individual outfits and see what works best for you.

So how can you successfully integrate the punk look into your outfit? How can you make your look less Burberry and more Black Flag? Well take a few cues from EveryGuyed’s ‘Guide to Incorporating Punk Fashion Into Your Look’

Don’t Do That

It’s easy to just put a Green Day t-shirt underneath your blazer and add a studded belt, but there’s nothing punk about that in either iconography or ideology.

You want to avoid band-related clothing, leather blazers, spikes, studs, red-and-black neckties, and other things that are more mainstream perceptions about the genre.

You’re a grown up now, and there are ways for you to wear your discord on your sleeve: ways that don’t involve shopping at Hot Topic.

You’re a grown up now, and there are ways for you to wear your discord on your sleeve: ways that don’t involve shopping at Hot Topic.

General Advice

While some visual elements in punk fashion like studs and leather recur, the most important thing to keep in mind are thematic elements. Rather than picking obvious elements like a skull pattern necktie, or a red and black striped shirt, go with things that are suggestive of punk rather than explicitly so.

Punk originated as the music of dissent and discord, so elements that are visually jarring or displeasing to the eye at first are things that you should go to.

A Child of the Jago uses unconventional colors and cuts to create a discordant look in its collection, rather than the leather and spikes that were favored in the early days of punk. Monochrome designs and clean cuts evocative of skinheads and rude boys are common.

Vivienne Westwood pioneered the tradition of punk in high fashion with bizarre cuts to create entirely new shapes in her Red Label collection. Loud, brash plaid patterns are common in her work, creating a distinctive visual signature you can emulate.

Similarly, Comme des Garcons utilizes patchwork designs, unconventional cuts, and nontraditional elements to create new silhouettes and looks.

Punk originated as the music of dissent and discord, so elements that are visually jarring or displeasing to the eye at first are things that you should go to.

Specific Pieces

Need some more concrete advice? Here are some more specific notes:

The Patchwork Blazer: Designers like Watanabe and Corre have been able to reinvent the blazer with wild cuts, or patchwork designs that combine the wearable with conceptual. Too much for some people, it can make a brilliant centerpiece for anybody with enough to carry it off.

The Plaid Shirt: Originating with Mods, rude boys and skinheads, plaid has become ubiquitous among nearly all punks. Go to a Rancid concert, and we guarantee you will see some plaid in the mosh pit. A red and black check on a button down shirt is a versatile piece. On its own, it’s a classic piece of office wear, but paired with black work pants, pins and suspenders and you get a classic punk look.

The Leather Motorcycle Jacket: A classic punk piece, less is more here. Don’t go overboard with patches and buttons and studs. A classic, simple piece in rough black leather goes with pretty much anything, and can be a versatile casual piece.

The Ratty Jeans: Everybody’s got one pair of ratty jeans that are ready for the Goodwill bin. Stained with house paint, a bit too tight in the calf, and with a bad rip in the left knee, you’d be mental to throw these out. Pair them with a check blazer and you’ve got a complete outfit.

A red and black check on a button down shirt is a versatile piece.

Summary

  • Punk in men’s fashion differs greatly from the punk fashion favored by teens
  • Rather than explicit references to punk, men’s punk flavored fashion has a subtler bent.
  • Unusual cuts, discordant imagery, and aesthetically difficult patterns are common.
  • Punk originated as a culture of dissent, so feel free to break rules with clothing
  • Specific pieces that can be useful include ratty jeans, leather jackets, and shirts and blazers in loud, obnoxious plaids.

Comments?

Still confused about this look? Not sure if you can pull this off without looking like an oldster? Use the comments box to get some tips from our community!

Author

Xiaoli Li
Xiaoli Li is an often-missed former editor at the EveryGuyed network. He's currently working as a freelance writer, and probably yelling at a soccer game somewhere out there.
Xiaoli Li

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What's on your mind?

  1. Eh…you can’t have an article called how to incorporate punk fashion into your look, and have the horns sign up there as if it had something to do with punk. The Horns were first introduced into METAL by Ronnie James Dio. It has nothing, nothing to do with punk…how am i to believe anything form this article when the most basic ideas of the genre are not understood by you sir, the author?

  2. Sad case of someone being paid to write an article with little knowledge and even less care.

    Comme des Garcons: $985 pair of oxford heels from Saks 5th Avenue
    Vivian Westwood: $100 “I love crap” tee-shirt.

    Neither of these are remotely Punk Rock (unless you stole the items, or cashed in your trust fund to invest in a new cocaine selling business and are trying- desperately and badly- to look the part)

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