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Facial/Body Hair

Facial Hair for Different Facial Types

facial hair for different facial types Facial Hair for Different Facial Types

So you’ve decided to join the illustrious ranks of men who rock facial hair as part of their look? EveryGuyed welcomes you to the halls of the hirsute. The band of bearded brothers. The mustachioed mafia. The fraternity of facial hair.

But before you just dive in there and decide to grow a full-blown Karl Marx beard or a moustache a-la John Waters, there are some things you need to consider. Lifestyle, facial shape, and growth patterns are all things to take into careful consideration when cultivating that new look.

To help you navigate these murky waters, EveryGuyed has assembled a list of some common face types, and some suggestions as to the facial hair designs that would best suit your face.

Identifying Your Face Type

Identifying the structure of your face is probably the most important step you’ll have to deal with here. What’s the most prominent feature of your face? Do you have a long chin? High cheekbones? A round face, or a long one? Find the feature of your face that defines you, and see if you need to accent it, or hide it.

The Squared Jaw

This is a facial type characterized by a strong jaw line, and this is always a feature you want your facial hair to accent as opposed to obscure: a short trimmed beard that’s bordering on five-o-clock shadow shows off the shape of the jaw, and is easy to maintain.

The Full Face

Think of it as a polite way of saying your face is shaped kind of like a circle. You weren’t blessed with a prominent jaw line, or high cheekbones; but that’s all right.

Consider going for a goatee or similar style of beard that emphasizes length. Moustaches and full beards emphasize the face’s width, making your face appear squat; a goatee creates a sense of length down along your face, making it appear longer.

High Cheekbones

This is a facial type characterized by sharp, angular jaw lines and a V-shaped appearance to the face. This often casts a pretty aggressive look right off the bat, so look to grow a minimal (One inch) beard that’s trimmed on the neck up to the jaw line; this will add definition and a little bit of bulk without seeming like you’re trying to hide something under all that hair.

The Long Face

An oval or oblong face is a blessing because you’ve basically been given a carte blanche; with an oval face you’re perfect for almost any style of facial hair. If you’re lucky enough to be a member of this follically-blessed fraternity, here are some suggestions:

Adding a thin sheen of stubble can shorten your face up if you fear it’s looking too long. A slightly outdated but still popular choice is a closely cropped, well-maintained moustache. A structured moustache like the handlebar can compliment the long facial structure nicely.

With a long face with a strong jaw line, you’re free to do almost whatever you like, so go ahead and experiment.

Prominent Features

Prominent features like a large chin or Romanesque nose are the last thing you want to draw attention to; so common sense dictates that you avoid prominent facial hair styles like moustaches or uniquely trimmed beards. Stick to clean looking stubble or a evenly trimmed beard and you’re likely to be safe; for the most part, this one is up to you since your confidence in your unique features is going to be key.

Other Facial Hair Notes

  • Never wear any moustache or beard named for someone. They’re invariably embarrassing. E.g. The Salvador Dali, The Tom Selleck, The Friedrich Nietzsche, The Wolverine
  • To get that perpetual five o’clock shadow look, consider investing in a shaver designed with a stubble feature.

Summary

  • Facial hair should be treated as an extension of your entire look, no less important than your jeans or shoes.
  • Determine what kind of face you have, what characteristics and features are prominent, and develop a plan for your facial hair before you start growing.
  • Use your facial hair to cover up, or draw attention away from flaws, and highlight strengths.

Comments?

Stubble-beating suggestions? Razor recommendations? Use the comment box below to get the discussion going!

Author

Xiaoli Li
Xiaoli Li is an often-missed former editor at the EveryGuyed network. He's currently working as a freelance writer, and probably yelling at a soccer game somewhere out there.
Xiaoli Li

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